The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo (2006)

Director
Amy Stechler

Main cast
Rita Moreno; Lila Downs

Genres
Documentary

Description
Rita Moreno narrates this documentary that chronicles the life of artist Frida Kahlo. The biography reveals Kahlo's story in conjunction with events that defined the times in which she lived and that shaped her life and artwork. Kahlo's tragedies and triumphs are examined, from her childhood through to her debilitating accident, her moving self-portraits, an affair with Russian radical Leon Trotsky and a tumultuous marriage to muralist Diego Rivera.


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