Grizzly Man (2005)

Director
Werner Herzog

Main cast
Timothy Treadwell; Kathleen Parker; Warren Queeney; Willy Fulton; Sam Egli

Genres
Documentary

Description
Werner Herzog’s documentary film about the “Grizzly Man” Timothy Treadwell and what the thirteen summers in a National Park in Alaska were like in one man’s attempt to protect the grizzly bears. The film is full of unique images and a look into the spirit of a man who sacrificed himself for nature.


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