Animals Are Beautiful People (1974)

Director
Jamie Uys

Main cast
Paddy O'Byrne

Genres
Comedy, Documentary

Description
Animals Are Beautiful People (aka Beautiful People) is a 1974 nature documentary about the wildlife in Southern Africa. It was filmed in the Namib Desert, the Kalahari Desert and the Okavango River and Okavango Delta. It was produced for cinema and has a length of slightly more than 90 minutes.


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