The Great Global Warming Swindle (2007)

Director
Martin Durkin

Main cast
Tim Ball; Nir Shaviv; Ian Clark

Genres
Documentary, Foreign

Description
This film tries to blow the whistle on what it calls the biggest swindle in modern history: 'Man Made Global Warming'. Watch this film and make up your own mind.


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