Pandora's Promise (2013)

Director
Robert Stone

Main cast
Stewart Brand; Gwyneth Cravens; Mark Lynas; Richard Rhodes; Michael Shellenberger

Genres
Documentary

Description
The atomic bomb, the specter of a global nuclear holocaust, and disasters like Fukushima have made nuclear energy synonymous with the darkest nightmares of the modern world. But what if everyone has nuclear power wrong? What if people knew that there are reactors that are self-sustaining and fully controllable and ones that require no waste disposal? What if nuclear power is the only energy source that has the ability to stop climate change?


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