The Fruit Hunters (2012)

Director
Yung Chang

Main cast
Bill Pullman

Genres
Documentary

Description
The Fruit Hunters explores the little known subculture and history of rare fruit hunters who travel the globe in an obsessive search for the exotic, in this stylish and sometimes erotic documentary.


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