Imaginary Witness: Hollywood and the Holocaust (2004)

Director
Daniel Anker

Main cast
Gene Hackman; Norma Barzman; Michael Berenbaum; Robert Clary; Dan Curtis

Genres
Documentary, History

Description
Daniel Anker’s 90-minute documentary takes on over 60 years of a very complex subject: Hollywood’s complicated, often contradictory relationship with Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. The questions it raises go right the very nature of how film functions in our culture, and while hardly exhaustive, Anker’s film makes for a good, thought provoking starting point.


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