Auschwitz (2011)

Director
Uwe Boll

Main cast
Steffen Mennekes; Nik Goldman; Arved Birnbaum; Alexis Wawerka; Maximilian Gartner

Genres
Drama, Foreign

Description
Auschwitz is a hard-hitting war film which shows life as it really was at the death camp.


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