Beyond Beauty: Taiwan from Above (2013)

Director
Chi Po-Lin

Main cast
Nien-Jen Wu; Xiang Hong; Cing-Soong Lai; Nolay Piho

Genres
Documentary

Description
Documenting Taiwan from an aerial perspective offering a glimpse of Taiwan's natural beauty as well as the effect of human activities and urbanization on our environment.


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